Can Dogs Eat Broccoli: Raw or Cooked?

can dogs eat broccoli

Today’s question: can dogs eat broccoli? Is broccoli good or bad for dogs? Scroll down for detailed answers.

When trying to incorporate healthy options into your daily diet, you may wish to begin with vegetables.  Veggies from across the color spectrum are recommended to provide the most nutritional benefit to your body.  Eating foods that derive from the ground have become a new trend in diets, and the whole food movement has really taken hold.  Eating broccoli is a good way to reach the goals of health by eating close to the ground.  Our health truly benefits from the positive properties this greenish veggie incorporates.

Being utterly healthy, you might have considered sharing your veggies with your beloved furry pet. This is why you may have asked yourself – can dogs eat broccoli? Yes, broccoli is okay for your pet to eat. However, your dog’s needs are different from yours; this is why you should get acquainted with a couple of aspects with regard to this veggie.  Dogs are not meant to eat human food regularly, they are meant to eat dog food and meat sources.  Adding broccoli to your dog’s diet is safe, but only when offered in small bits and on occasion only.

Can Dogs Eat Broccoli – In Moderation

can dogs eat broccoli

The short answer is yes.

Dogs eat most any food that is offered to them, which is why offering your dog treats of the whole food nature is that much more important.   Dogs that eat most anything will happily overindulge in junk food.  Just as humans should limit their intake of junk food, so such is true for dogs as well.  When offered his/her choice of a veggie, your pup might relish occasional broccoli treats. If your dog takes to the taste and texture of broccoli, you are in luck!  Thus, you may consider spoiling your furry pet with a couple of broccoli behavioral treats from time to time – it’s perfectly safe to do so!

Nonetheless, this veggie, as healthy as it is, should not become a regular addition to your pup’s meals. The reason why offering broccoli regularly in meals is not advisable is because your pet might end up suffering from gastro-intestinal issues whenever s/he are given broccoli in large amounts.

Consequently, consider introducing only small amounts of this food at first. Doctors recommend that when/if you choose to feed your dog human food, to offer the food in small amounts to ensure the dog is able to tolerate the food change.  Dogs have a special digestive system, unique to them, that does not always cooperate with the human food we tend to feed them.  Dogs cannot break down certain elements of human food and need to be introduced to these foods slowly.

Keep an eye on of any side effects that may occur.  If you notice any type of discomfort or reaction in your dog, be sure to contact your vet for further advice.   If your dog seems well (no diarrhea or upset stomach) then your buddy is most likely to benefit from broccoli’s health properties.

Dogs who tolerate broccoli have the ability to digest the food without any tummy troubles or complications.  Offering broccoli that is chopped, pureed, or seamed may be the safest way in which your dog should be served.  The smaller and softer portions of chopped and steamed broccoli will ensure your dog does not choke.  Soft broccoli is also easier for a dog to chew than raw broccoli.  Steaming broccoli may leave the veggie without as many vitamins since steaming is related to mineral lose, but your dog will still benefit from the remaining vitamins and nutrient, as well as benefitting from a piece of veggie rather than a cookie or a bone.

Adding broccoli into the diet of your dog can be simple and easy when simply blending the veggie in with his/her actual food.  You do not have to feed your pup a broccoli spear and risk your pup refusing it.  Mixing in with existing food may make your dog more inclined to ingest the food without complaint.

Health Benefits of Broccoli

Broccoli is one of the healthiest vegetables. It is an excellent source of vitamin K, C, E, B6 and essential minerals including iron, chromium, phosphorus, manganese, potassium and magnesium. This super-food is also meant to effectively deal with chronic inflammations while at the same time embodying antioxidant properties.  Antioxidants will help your dog remain healthy and purge any infections faster and easier than if s/he was deprived of this nutrient.  A healthy immune system transfers throughout many areas of health.  Dogs, as well as humans, can benefit from a healthy immune system that functions properly.

Given its richness in vitamin C, which your dog utterly requires, broccoli is a great occasional treat. Many dog owners may not feel that their dog needs additional Vitamin C like we do, but dogs do benefit from the added vitamin intake.  Granted, their vitamins are supplied by their kibble; however, Vitamin C can boost immunity and stave off colds and flu’s.  Dogs are just as apt to developing sickness and disease as their human friends, therefore, protecting your friend with added Vitamin C from broccoli can help you both in the long run.

Additionally, the intake of this veggie might aid at naturally cleansing your pup’s teeth. Those who do not brush the teeth of their dog regularly put their pup at risk of developing tooth decay and gum disease.  Diseases of the teeth and gums have the ability to spread to other areas of the body, putting your dog at higher risk of developing deadly disorders.  If you simply cannot brush the teeth of your dog, adding broccoli to your dog’s diet may do the job of cleaning your pup’s teeth for you.  Chewing on the broccoli is a natural tooth cleanser and may even remove tartar from the gum line.  Sometimes, dogs need to be given an incentive in order to freshen up their breath for a change. Broccoli seems to do the trick just perfectly.  The dog sees the broccoli as a treat, and you see the broccoli as a way to clean your dog’s mouth.  Broccoli is a win-win.

Broccoli Can Significantly Improve Detoxification

Among broccoli’s beneficial properties, the leafy, crunchy green has also an amazing effect in improving detoxification. Detoxifying one’s body is seen as a popular natural health trend, aiming at purifying the body and ridding your system from any potential environmental or food toxins absorbed throughout the day.

Many feel that dogs also benefit from the purification processes.  Broccoli has the ability to stimulate the activity of the body’s enzymes that are involved in the process of detoxification. Therefore, as it aims at controlling the body’s detoxification activity, broccoli may help deter the occurrence of detrimental aspects of dangerous substances and viruses.

Broccoli’s Anti-Inflammatory Properties

We cannot overlook broccoli’s anti-inflammatory properties. Being a rich source of powerful phytonutrients, broccoli can develop a beneficial impact on the overall health condition of your dog, both in preventing and treating inflammation naturally. Thus, your pet will most certainly boost its health by having an occasional broccoli treat.

When the body is inflamed, the body works harder to determine the source of inflammation and reduce swelling.  When the body works harder, the body may not have enough energy left to seek and destroy germ cells.  Keeping one’s body free of inflammation frees up the body system to fight germs and sickness naturally.  The same is true for dogs

Broccoli’s Antioxidant Properties

As this greenish veggie is basically loaded with so many vitamins and minerals, it significantly aims at diminishing the levels of oxidative stress. The nutrients broccoli embodies sustain oxygen metabolism, while at the same time lowering the risk of potential infections and even cancerous diseases. Concurrently, your dog’s immunity will significantly benefit from broccoli treats.

Broccoli Prevents Cancer

The sole combination of anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and detoxification properties make broccoli a super-ingredient that effectively prevents and lowers the risks of cancer. That would be because the occurrence of this harsh health condition is often linked with inflammatory and oxidative problems, as well as ineffective detoxification

The Possible Side Effects of Broccoli

Broccoli might incorporate a couple of side effect to your dog’s health. That is because the head of broccoli encompasses a potential toxic substance named Isothiocyanate, which can cause gastric issues. This is one of the reasons why you should spoil your pup with broccoli treats only on occasions.

Thus, you should rather opt for feeding your furry friend with the stems of the broccoli, as the top of the veggie contains the harmful ingredient. Also, upset stomach might occur if your dog has had too much broccoli.

However, when feeding your furry pet with occasional veggie treats, it’s always a good idea to take into account the size and age of your pet. A smaller breed of dogs should be given a much smaller portion than a large breed of dog, for instance.

Broccoli – Raw or Cooked?

Wash the veggie thoroughly and cut it into small pieces. Raw broccoli may be difficult to digest, consider steaming the veggie for a couple of minutes, just enough to soak it a bit, but at the same time preserve its green color. It will still embody its beneficial properties, while being easier for your furry pet to chew on.

Additionally, you should keep the top of the veggie and provide your pup only with its stems. As I mentioned above, the top of the veggie embodies a toxin detrimental for your pup’s health.

Conclusion

Dogs are omnivores, so they’re naturally inclined to savor fruit and vegetable treats once in a while, that’s for sure. However, you should keep in mind that broccoli behavioral treats should not exceed 5 percent of your fuzzy dog’s overall diet.

 

 

Related articles:

Can Dogs Eat Crackers

Can Dogs Eat Cabbage

References:

http://whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=9

http://canigivemydog.com/broccoli

http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/best-fruits-and-vegetables-for-dogs

http://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/

http://www.dogchannel.com/dog-food/vegetables-for-dogs.aspx

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